Teagan Adams

“Decide to start today”

Teagan Adams is a sixteen-year-old serial entrepreneur, TEDx speaker, author, and podcast host. (SIXTEEN)

He started his entrepreneurial journey at the age of nine by raising money to build a school in Kenya, Africa with his lemonade stands.

At the age of ten he was on the national television show ‘Dragons Den’ where he pitched his first company, Doogoods.

He now does assemblies at elementary schools to spread this Doogoods movement and raise the next generation as UPstanders instead of bystanders.

Teagan is also the author of ‘Success Principles: Unlock Your Limitless Potential’ and recently launched a podcast called ‘Success Academy’ where he has been interviewing world-class entrepreneurs.

Teagan’s take on momentum is going to motivate you to do the THING, whatever your thing is!

Enjoy!

Find Teagan on his website! On Instagram!

Show Notes

Introduction:                     00:00                     Welcome to the Wrighter’s Way Podcast where we celebrate writers who have completed their books and inspire writers who haven’t. Join Laurie and her guests as they talk about writing, books, and life in between chapters.

Laurie:                                  00:17                     Hi everyone. It’s Laurie from the Wrighter’s Way back again today with the podcast and I’m so excited to bring to you the coolest teenager that I think I’ve ever met. Teagan, welcome to you again.

Teagan:                                00:31                     Thanks. Thanks for having me on the show.

Laurie:                                  00:33                     You’re welcome. I saw you speak at a conference I was at a few weeks ago and you mentioned that you had written a book and I thought to myself, there’s people my age who are dragging their feet and can’t get their acts together even though they want to. And here you are, you’re 16 and you’ve written and published a book and you do a lot of other things. So can you tell us a bit about you and the other things that you do?

Teagan:                                00:57                     Yeah, so I’m a 16 year old entrepreneur. I do like some different things. I got started when I was nine with like entrepreneurship. That’s dinda like how I got started with, I started kind of a card game and I was on Dragon’s Den with that. So that’s kind of what kind of sparked my interest in entrepreneurship and stuff. So I’ve been doing lots of different things, kind of experimenting and lots of different things kind of honestly kind of not really focusing on anything in particular, but just trying lots of different things kind of thing. Um, but now I’m starting to focus a bit more doing things like speaking gigs around what I talk about is around momentum and like the law of momentum kind of thing. So then that’s kind of what I wrote my book about now is it’s called Success Principles: Unlock Your Limitless Potential. So it’s basically around like helping people to sort of unlock their limitless potential through like these 10 sort of principles and one of those is like you saw me talk about sort of the law of momentum kind of thing. So that’s kinda where I’m at now and I do some different things around that. But yeah, basically with the book, like I just kind of one day decided that I wanted to write a book and also doing public speaking, I figured it’d be a good thing to kind of leverage for that. So that’s kind of how that got started.

Laurie:                                  02:03                     Yeah. And you, you talk about something that none of the other people I’ve interviewed have talked about, which is less about the, you know, book really and more about the credibility.

Teagan:                                02:13                     Yeah.

Laurie:                                  02:14                     How has that worked out for you? That was the intention in writing the book and then has that worked out?

Teagan:                                02:20                     Yeah, definitely. So the book, like the purpose of the book, like you said, it wasn’t really its own thing in my case. Like I know a lot of people will go and the book is like their thing they’re focused on, but for me I was like the book was cool and everything and I did one obviously sell some, but the main goal really was just to kind of use it to then have just like that credibility because I feel like when you say you’re an author then people are more likely to book you for speaking gigs or things like that. And I feel like that just adds a lot of credibility because I mean if you’re able to kind of package your ideas into like a book, then they know that you’re going to be able to probably come up with a speaking gig around that kind of thing. So I feel like it’s definitely, it’s definitely just a really good way to sort of position yourself as more of an expert kind of thing and just like in that sense for sure.

Laurie:                                  03:02                     Okay. And how many Ted talks have you done?

Teagan:                                03:06                     I’ve done two, so I did one that was like, I think like two years ago. I did one on like kindness and that kind of stuff because I was like the sort of card game that I created was like around kindness and that kind of stuff. And then my more recent one was around, it was actually around momentum, but I didn’t really mean to do it around momentum and that was before I really started talking about momentum. It was kind of I just saw that the auditions were happening so I was like thinking it would be cool to audition and maybe do another ted talk kind of thing. And I submitted my video and it was just like a two minute video and in it I was talking about like avoiding analysis paralysis and just being overwhelmed with so many different things and how to just really just take action. And so that was what my audition was and then I didn’t really have an idea. I just kind of wanted to get the opportunity to do that. So then I was like, okay, I got to come up with something around that. So then I was just doing some research and then I just kind of thought of calling it like more positioned around momentum and that kind of stuff. So just talking about how like in order to gain momentum you have to focus on one thing instead of just like kind of splitting your focus because a lot of people are trying to do so many different things, but they don’t. It’s, you know, like widespread mediocrity instead of greatness in one thing kind of thing. So, so yeah, that’s kind of how that second one got started.

Laurie:                                  04:17                     Love that. Okay. Before we keep going and I forget to tell people what the car game’s called, I actually own it. I wish I had it to hold it up. But you have it with you to hold that or anything?

Teagan:                                04:27                     No, I don’t. Sorry. Yeah.

Laurie:                                  04:29                     That’s okay. Tell us what it’s called and a bit about what it is. Because I think a lot of people watching this are probably moms like me and they might be interested.

Teagan:                                04:37                     Yeah. So it’s called Doogoods. It’s like when I was nine is when I first had the idea and I just kind of drew it out, so basically it’s like each card has its own character and I just kind of drew out the character and then they each have like a challenge related to kind of simple acts of kindness. Basically the whole idea of it is just get kids completing simple acts of kindness and making, doing good fun and kindness cool kind of thing. So I mean, yeah, if anyone’s interested, they are still available at Doogoods.com and it’s like d o o g o o d s kind of thing. So that’s not what I focus on too much, but I still do have that and I do some assemblies at elementary schools kind of around that, but yeah.

Laurie:                                  05:10                     Okay. So you speak at elementary schools. We’ve done two ted talks. Is there any other specific sort of speaking gigs that you look for or…

Teagan:                                05:21                     Yeah, so I, I haven’t really done a whole lot previously other than like when I was younger doing some sort of more like free things or, you know, different things like that, but now I’m working on actually like focusing on building, like an actual speaking business kind of thing. So I’m looking to get more like, you know, entrepreneurial events, conferences, things like that. That’s what I’m working on doing and just kind of using my book as positioning and that kind of stuff to kind of talk around the law of momentum, that kind of stuff. So…

Laurie:                                  05:47                     Really cool. So since I heard you talk about the law of momentum, it’s something, you know, you’ve heard kind of in bits and pieces before when people say like it’s easier to keep going in that, yeah, but it’s been front and center in my mind since you said that and I’ve used it, but I’ve talked to other people like just start and then just keep going.

Teagan:                                06:03                     Yeah. Yeah.

Laurie:                                  06:04                     So, so let’s talk. Let’s back up a little bit and I’d like to talk to people because I feel like writing and publishing is such a mind game for a lot of people. So tell me about your feelings and sort of how you felt before and then after you were finally done and it was published, how did you feel sort of throughout that process?

Teagan:                                06:25                     I feel like I’m at the start, you know, it’s kind of overwhelming, to like have to write a book, you know, it’s kind of like, seems like a big thing too. I mean you look at these books and there’s so many ideas in them so much do you have to kind of come up with to fill out all the pages kind of thing. You know what I mean? So like it’s kind of overwhelming at the start but once you really just get started then it really gets going and then it’s not too hard once you actually just start kind of thing. And then like once you’re done looking back you realize that it really wasn’t that hard. It’s just, I mean it is nice when you’re finished, it’s kind of like that sort of sense of relief and now you can just kinda use that as leverage kind of thing. But. But yeah, like definitely I feel like the one key thing for like getting started for me before, like I said, it was kind of overwhelming and that kind of stuff. But I know like in the talk that I did around momentum, one of the things that I talked about is like, you know, Newton’s first law of motion states that an object in rest stays at rest but then an object in motion stays in motion. So that’s dinda like what happened for me is just once you just take action, just start writing, then you get the momentum picking up and then it just keeps going, keeps going and it gets to the point where like all of the ideas just kind of start flooding in and it just gets to the point where all of a sudden you have a finished book and it really isn’t that hard once you just get started kind of thing.

Laurie:                                  07:33                     Yeah, yeah, I totally, I totally agree with that. You build up in your mind and you don’t do it. You don’t do it, you don’t do it. And it becomes huge and that as soon as you start, you know, it’s much smaller and much more doable. Okay. So, talk to us about how long the writing process took for you.

Teagan:                                07:51                     Yeah, so basically it was like kind of in the works for awhile for me. Like I feel like that’s usually the way it is when people want to write a book. It’s usually like, like, especially if it’s a nonfiction book then like, you know, it’s going to be something that they’re kind of thinking about for awhile. Maybe you were getting ideas from different places and just from different experiences and things like that. So in my case it was definitely kind of in the works for awhile and just like I kind of have this thing where I always write down ideas and thoughts into my notes on my phone and so I’m just always like collecting these different ideas and I read a lot of books. So you know, it’s like all of these different ideas combined and like with my own sort of spin on it, so it’s been technically the writing process took me a while, but really the actual writing was basically I got to the point where I had so many ideas so all I had to do was really organize those ideas and just kind of outline it. And then once I had that outlined, the actual writing took only like probably a month or so of the actual writing process of really just a few days of just like getting down and just writing for like even an hour or more just kind of writing because I feel like that definitely helps too is when you just block out that time and just kind of focus. Yeah. So like overall though it was about a month of writing with or even just like a few weeks kind of thing. But yeah.

Laurie:                                  09:02                     Yeah. And it sounds like you sort of outlined and planned all on your phone and your notes. So then when you actually sat down and there was a lot of it already done.

Teagan:                                09:12                     Yeah.

Laurie:                                  09:12                     Nice. Okay, cool. Um, what advice would you have for people who haven’t published their books yet or maybe finished writing them?

Teagan:                                09:23                     Well, so if you, if you’re kind of maybe putting it off for you know, different things like that or you don’t know where to start then like I said earlier, the best way to start is just start. So that’s like the first thing. But then the second thing would be really just to like block out time. Like I mentioned a little bit, but I feel like sometimes you’ll say you want to do something but then you just kind of leave it to chance sort of thing. So you’re like okay I’ll get to it eventually or whatever. And then that one day becomes like you’re never going to do it, so you just have to decide to make today your day one kind of thing. And then just like, I’m really decide to start today and then just block out time. So kind of stop what you’re doing if you were gonna obviously you have to do certain things but say you’re going to watch like a TV show or something, maybe decide to not do that and you can do that another day and in that hour that you would have watched tv instead just focus on writing and then, because I mean we all have the same 24 hours in a day so it’s really just about what you do with it and there’s that quote like time does fly, but you’re the pilot so it’s all about just kind of structuring your time in the right way so that you can just leave room for that and really just kind of planning it out and actually having these time blocks of like exact times when you’re going to just focus on writing and then it, it’s really like if you do that then you’ll be able to write the book for sure.

Laurie:                                  10:36                     Cool. And share with us, you wrote to me about the actual science behind once you actually sit down, like you said, block off your time and sit down and focus, share with people the science behind why that actually helps.

Teagan:                                10:49                     Yeah. So I mean there’s lots of different kind of studies are things around this like term, like, you know, deep work or things like that where instead of just chopping up your work, you’re able to just like focus for like an hour, even a few hours at a time on one thing without any distractions kind of thing. And the analogy that I use is just like, you know, if you have to push a car from point a to point b, if you’re kind of chopping up your work overtime, so you’re like going to work for like 30 minutes and then take a break and then come back for like a little bit later and do something else maybe. And just like, you know, constantly chopping up your work. Then it’s like when you’re pushing a car and you push it a little bit and then you stop. And then you push it a little bit and it never really gets momentum, but when you’re, when you’re actually focusing on it for a long time and you’re pushing it, it gets to the point where it gets rolling and you don’t even really have to do anything. You just let momentum do it’s job kind of thing. So. But then like you were asking like the actual science behind it is like there’s this thing called Myelin and it, it’s like when you’re focused for a long period of time, it kind of develops over your neurons and actually makes your brain cells fire much faster. So it makes you much more effective and creative. And basically the way this happens is just when you’re like, it won’t happen right away, but it’s like when you’re focused on one thing for a while, it gets the point where it’s like, that’s you’re able to really get to the point where you really gain momentum and you’re really able to just focus a lot better. And eventually you get a lot more done but focusing for like a long time kind of thing. And then that’s basically how it works. And then I know there are other terms that people use, like, you know, flow states, there’s I’m the guy that coined that term kind of thing and there’s lots of different things around that of just like, you know, focusing. And then when you, when you focus, that’s when everything just kind of starts rolling and that’s when, like I said, the momentum just kind of picks up.

Laurie:                                  12:30                     And so when you talk about, after you focused, you know, for awhile, can you just share with people, are you talking about like a half an hour and then that brain stuff starts happening? Are we talking like eight hours so that people have an idea what they have to block?

Teagan:                                12:43                     Yeah. So I’m not entirely sure of the exact thing. I feel like in a way it kind of depends on the person, but I would say like as sort of a recommendation, I’d say like for starters, if you were to focus for like half an hour, then eventually you get to the point where definitely you are going to be able to really be the focus and even if you did for like an hour, if you blocked out like an hour of time just to focus then you are then that’ll definitely get that kind of working. Like you don’t necessarily need to work for eight hours or whatever. Tt doesn’t need to be super long because then it also gets the point where you know, you get kind of tired I guess. So then it’s less effective. So like the other way but, but yeah, I feel like just to the point that you can actually manage to actually stay focused and just kind of figure out you know, what works best for you, how long you can stay focused and then just kind of do that amount of time. Like as much as you can. Really.

Laurie:                                  13:33                     Yeah. I agree with you and I feel like if people started with an hour they would, you can feel it right, you on, you get frustrated and you click all around in your brain kind of and then you hit that flow state. So for some people you’re right, maybe it’s a half an hour, maybe it’s an hour, maybe it’s two hours, but as long as you block off an hour maybe to start with and then just pay attention. You learn for your own self when you hit that sweet spot.

Teagan:                                13:58                     Yeah, exactly. Well and also I feel like some people they might like, you know, they’ll only focus for half an hour or whatever and so then they think like you’re saying, they’re kind of like scatter scatterbrained or whatever. They’re just kind of not really experiencing this focus. So then they’re thinking, okay, well I’m done now I’m already getting not focused anymore and stuff. So then they get distracted and like keep on moving around. But, I feel really you just need to try it and actually be able to like kind of stretch that out and actually focus for awhile and then that’s when you’re going to get to the point where you actually see what you can actually last for kind of thing.

Laurie:                                  14:29                     Don’t give up next to the one hour. Yeah. What would you say is the best thing you’ve learned throughout this process?

Teagan:                                14:39                     I mean really like aside from just getting started, it’s really just like, I guess it is really important definitely to kind of lay things out and really organize your thoughts because on the other side of things it’s talking about, you know, like just getting started. But then on the other side of things, you don’t want to just get started without actually having sort of a plan in place for where you’re going to go. Because that’s something that I kind of did at the start is I just literally just kind of started writing and then I didn’t actually have a plan of where I was going to go with this. So it was just kind of all over the place so then I had to kind of restart and actually organize my thoughts better because you want to have it like actually be able to flow from one point to another and organize what the chapters are, what you want people to get out from it and like really making the whole book kind of be like a journey starting from where the person is to by the end of the book they’re going to know how to get from where they are to where they want to go. And then also in each chapter is kind of like a mini journey I guess where like each chapter is like an individualized, taking them from one place to another place from where they are to where they want to go. And then the book is the bigger version of that where it’s kinda like that I feel like just kind of structuring that flow so that you can actually like just structured a lot better and just really organized your thoughts that way.

Laurie:                                  15:50                     So you’re definitely a fan of plotting and outlining. There’s a whole movement of people that prefer to, they call it pantsing, fly by the seat of their pants and just let the flow take them and let it all come out. But I kind of agree with you. Some books do come out. I wrote one book, the first in a chapter book series. I think I wrote it in one evening in a couple of hours and of course I had to edit it, but then the second and the third one, it’s like pulling teeth. I can’t get it out. So finally I realized okay, I should really start outlining. And you’re right, it makes it a lot easier. And then you see the arc in each chapter you see the arc over the whole book. So you’ve learned a lot about writing obviously. Were you always into writing?

Teagan:                                16:31                     Yeah, I would say so. Like it’s never been necessarily something that I really enjoyed. But like when I was, when I was young I did read a lot of fiction books and stuff. Like ever since I was really young kid, I remember when I was like, I don’t know, probably younger than 10, I think I was super proud because I actually remember one day how I, I literally read Garfield, it was like some comic for like four hours straight or something like that. But yeah, so I’ve always, I’ve always been really into that kind of reading and then as I got older I got more into like entrepreneurship and stuff. So I’ve been reading lots of nonfiction books but. So I’ve been really into reading. But then on the actual writing side of things, I haven’t always really necessarily enjoyed writing but, but I did, once I got started with this book, it was, it was kind of a fun process for the most part.

Laurie:                                  17:18                     I think that’s so incredible that you’re 16 and you’ve written this book and you’ve learned all that stuff and apply it to yourself. And is the book selling well? Like how many dollar signs have you made and what’s the best thing that you’ve bought or that you find to buy?

Teagan:                                17:33                     Yeah. So, it’s honestly, I’m not even sure exactly how many it’s sold. I know I’ve been selling someone Amazon and online, but the main, the main way that I’m selling it right now is really just like taking it to events where I’m speaking at and then I mentioned earlier how like, you know, using it as credibility but then also once you have that speaking gig, it’s a good way to sort of make money on the back end as well selling the books there. So that’s kind of the main way that I’ve been doing it is doing a speaking gig and then people will want to buy the book, things like that. So and then as for the thing that I want to buy with like what I’m making from that. Honestly for me the main thing is just like investing in, I know it sounds kind of boring or whatever, but like honestly I don’t even at this point care that much to buy like different sorts of things. The main thing is just really reinvesting back into like learning, doing more things entrepreneurial wise or even just like doing things like traveling and networking at events and things like that I feel like is definitely a good thing to do. For sure.

Laurie:                                  18:30                     How old are you again? Yeah, you sound a lot like me. That’s exactly what I like to spend my money on too. But I’m not sure that most kids your age feel the same. It doesn’t sound boring to me because I love it too. I just, I love to learn and I’ll definitely spend my money where I think it’s going to be worth my time as far as learning and the traveling. Yes, absolutely.

Teagan:                                18:54                     Yeah. I mean if, if you enjoy it then you may as well because I mean you’re going to make more money from that, so.

Laurie:                                  18:58                     Yeah. Yeah. So can you share with people, um, do you have a website or how they can find your book or if somebody wanted to maybe book you for speaking or talked to you about that, can you share where they can find you?

Teagan:                                19:11                     Yeah, so probably the best way is if you go to bookteagan.Mykajabi.Com, so that’s like book and t e a g a n . my and then k a j a B I.com. Okay. So that’s kinda like the website that I just created fairly recently and it’s just kind of for like booking speaking gigs and then more info on I have like my speaker reel on there. It’s getting created at the time we’re recording this, but by the time this is released it’ll probably be, it should be done like in a couple of days. So, but yeah, so that’s probably the best way. Or just like on instagram @TeaganAdams1, that’s where people can reach out if they want to find out more. Whatever.

Laurie:                                  19:51                     I’m just gonna write it down because I’ll share it in the notes when this does go out to teaganadams1 on Instagram. Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing with us. I think that, so many people will find your story really inspirational just like I do because I just feel like there’s no excuses and I love how you talk about, you know, like it is a mind game and just stop overthinking it and start taking the action and just start with those baby steps and start pushing that car and then don’t stop.

Teagan:                                20:20                     Yeah. For sure yeah.

Laurie:                                  20:22                     Cool. Any last wisdom or words or…?

Teagan:                                20:26                     Not really. I think that’s kind of the main thing, but yeah, I mean just leaving off with just that one thing. Just get started. Just if you’re wanting to write a book, just like keep learning, but the main thing is really just take action and just start writing and that’s, that’s really the key thing that I want everyone to take away from this for sure.

Laurie:                                  20:41                     Cool. Thank you so much Teagan. I’ll say goodbye.

Teagan:                                20:44                     Yeah. Thank you.

Laurie:                                  20:47                     Thank you.

Outro:                                   20:47                     You’ve been listening to the Wrighter’s Way Podcast. For show notes, links to gets information, and to learn more about the Wrighter’s Way check out lauriewrighter.com. Until next week, enjoy this chapter of your life.

Introduction:                     00:00                     Welcome to the Wrighter’s Way Podcast where we celebrate writers who have completed their books and inspire writers who haven’t. Join Laurie and her guests as they talk about writing, books, and life in between chapters.

Laurie:                                  00:17                     Hi everyone. It’s Laurie from the Wrighter’s Way back again today with the podcast and I’m so excited to bring to you the coolest teenager that I think I’ve ever met. Teagan, welcome to you again.

Teagan:                                00:31                     Thanks. Thanks for having me on the show.

Laurie:                                  00:33                     You’re welcome. I saw you speak at a conference I was at a few weeks ago and you mentioned that you had written a book and I thought to myself, there’s people my age who are dragging their feet and can’t get their acts together even though they want to. And here you are, you’re 16 and you’ve written and published a book and you do a lot of other things. So can you tell us a bit about you and the other things that you do?

Teagan:                                00:57                     Yeah, so I’m a 16 year old entrepreneur. I do like some different things. I got started when I was nine with like entrepreneurship. That’s dinda like how I got started with, I started kind of a card game and I was on Dragon’s Den with that. So that’s kind of what kind of sparked my interest in entrepreneurship and stuff. So I’ve been doing lots of different things, kind of experimenting and lots of different things kind of honestly kind of not really focusing on anything in particular, but just trying lots of different things kind of thing. Um, but now I’m starting to focus a bit more doing things like speaking gigs around what I talk about is around momentum and like the law of momentum kind of thing. So then that’s kind of what I wrote my book about now is it’s called Success Principles: Unlock Your Limitless Potential. So it’s basically around like helping people to sort of unlock their limitless potential through like these 10 sort of principles and one of those is like you saw me talk about sort of the law of momentum kind of thing. So that’s kinda where I’m at now and I do some different things around that. But yeah, basically with the book, like I just kind of one day decided that I wanted to write a book and also doing public speaking, I figured it’d be a good thing to kind of leverage for that. So that’s kind of how that got started.

Laurie:                                  02:03                     Yeah. And you, you talk about something that none of the other people I’ve interviewed have talked about, which is less about the, you know, book really and more about the credibility.

Teagan:                                02:13                     Yeah.

Laurie:                                  02:14                     How has that worked out for you? That was the intention in writing the book and then has that worked out?

Teagan:                                02:20                     Yeah, definitely. So the book, like the purpose of the book, like you said, it wasn’t really its own thing in my case. Like I know a lot of people will go and the book is like their thing they’re focused on, but for me I was like the book was cool and everything and I did one obviously sell some, but the main goal really was just to kind of use it to then have just like that credibility because I feel like when you say you’re an author then people are more likely to book you for speaking gigs or things like that. And I feel like that just adds a lot of credibility because I mean if you’re able to kind of package your ideas into like a book, then they know that you’re going to be able to probably come up with a speaking gig around that kind of thing. So I feel like it’s definitely, it’s definitely just a really good way to sort of position yourself as more of an expert kind of thing and just like in that sense for sure.

Laurie:                                  03:02                     Okay. And how many Ted talks have you done?

Teagan:                                03:06                     I’ve done two, so I did one that was like, I think like two years ago. I did one on like kindness and that kind of stuff because I was like the sort of card game that I created was like around kindness and that kind of stuff. And then my more recent one was around, it was actually around momentum, but I didn’t really mean to do it around momentum and that was before I really started talking about momentum. It was kind of I just saw that the auditions were happening so I was like thinking it would be cool to audition and maybe do another ted talk kind of thing. And I submitted my video and it was just like a two minute video and in it I was talking about like avoiding analysis paralysis and just being overwhelmed with so many different things and how to just really just take action. And so that was what my audition was and then I didn’t really have an idea. I just kind of wanted to get the opportunity to do that. So then I was like, okay, I got to come up with something around that. So then I was just doing some research and then I just kind of thought of calling it like more positioned around momentum and that kind of stuff. So just talking about how like in order to gain momentum you have to focus on one thing instead of just like kind of splitting your focus because a lot of people are trying to do so many different things, but they don’t. It’s, you know, like widespread mediocrity instead of greatness in one thing kind of thing. So, so yeah, that’s kind of how that second one got started.

Laurie:                                  04:17                     Love that. Okay. Before we keep going and I forget to tell people what the car game’s called, I actually own it. I wish I had it to hold it up. But you have it with you to hold that or anything?

Teagan:                                04:27                     No, I don’t. Sorry. Yeah.

Laurie:                                  04:29                     That’s okay. Tell us what it’s called and a bit about what it is. Because I think a lot of people watching this are probably moms like me and they might be interested.

Teagan:                                04:37                     Yeah. So it’s called Doogoods. It’s like when I was nine is when I first had the idea and I just kind of drew it out, so basically it’s like each card has its own character and I just kind of drew out the character and then they each have like a challenge related to kind of simple acts of kindness. Basically the whole idea of it is just get kids completing simple acts of kindness and making, doing good fun and kindness cool kind of thing. So I mean, yeah, if anyone’s interested, they are still available at Doogoods.com and it’s like d o o g o o d s kind of thing. So that’s not what I focus on too much, but I still do have that and I do some assemblies at elementary schools kind of around that, but yeah.

Laurie:                                  05:10                     Okay. So you speak at elementary schools. We’ve done two ted talks. Is there any other specific sort of speaking gigs that you look for or…

Teagan:                                05:21                     Yeah, so I, I haven’t really done a whole lot previously other than like when I was younger doing some sort of more like free things or, you know, different things like that, but now I’m working on actually like focusing on building, like an actual speaking business kind of thing. So I’m looking to get more like, you know, entrepreneurial events, conferences, things like that. That’s what I’m working on doing and just kind of using my book as positioning and that kind of stuff to kind of talk around the law of momentum, that kind of stuff. So…

Laurie:                                  05:47                     Really cool. So since I heard you talk about the law of momentum, it’s something, you know, you’ve heard kind of in bits and pieces before when people say like it’s easier to keep going in that, yeah, but it’s been front and center in my mind since you said that and I’ve used it, but I’ve talked to other people like just start and then just keep going.

Teagan:                                06:03                     Yeah. Yeah.

Laurie:                                  06:04                     So, so let’s talk. Let’s back up a little bit and I’d like to talk to people because I feel like writing and publishing is such a mind game for a lot of people. So tell me about your feelings and sort of how you felt before and then after you were finally done and it was published, how did you feel sort of throughout that process?

Teagan:                                06:25                     I feel like I’m at the start, you know, it’s kind of overwhelming, to like have to write a book, you know, it’s kind of like, seems like a big thing too. I mean you look at these books and there’s so many ideas in them so much do you have to kind of come up with to fill out all the pages kind of thing. You know what I mean? So like it’s kind of overwhelming at the start but once you really just get started then it really gets going and then it’s not too hard once you actually just start kind of thing. And then like once you’re done looking back you realize that it really wasn’t that hard. It’s just, I mean it is nice when you’re finished, it’s kind of like that sort of sense of relief and now you can just kinda use that as leverage kind of thing. But. But yeah, like definitely I feel like the one key thing for like getting started for me before, like I said, it was kind of overwhelming and that kind of stuff. But I know like in the talk that I did around momentum, one of the things that I talked about is like, you know, Newton’s first law of motion states that an object in rest stays at rest but then an object in motion stays in motion. So that’s dinda like what happened for me is just once you just take action, just start writing, then you get the momentum picking up and then it just keeps going, keeps going and it gets to the point where like all of the ideas just kind of start flooding in and it just gets to the point where all of a sudden you have a finished book and it really isn’t that hard once you just get started kind of thing.

Laurie:                                  07:33                     Yeah, yeah, I totally, I totally agree with that. You build up in your mind and you don’t do it. You don’t do it, you don’t do it. And it becomes huge and that as soon as you start, you know, it’s much smaller and much more doable. Okay. So, talk to us about how long the writing process took for you.

Teagan:                                07:51                     Yeah, so basically it was like kind of in the works for awhile for me. Like I feel like that’s usually the way it is when people want to write a book. It’s usually like, like, especially if it’s a nonfiction book then like, you know, it’s going to be something that they’re kind of thinking about for awhile. Maybe you were getting ideas from different places and just from different experiences and things like that. So in my case it was definitely kind of in the works for awhile and just like I kind of have this thing where I always write down ideas and thoughts into my notes on my phone and so I’m just always like collecting these different ideas and I read a lot of books. So you know, it’s like all of these different ideas combined and like with my own sort of spin on it, so it’s been technically the writing process took me a while, but really the actual writing was basically I got to the point where I had so many ideas so all I had to do was really organize those ideas and just kind of outline it. And then once I had that outlined, the actual writing took only like probably a month or so of the actual writing process of really just a few days of just like getting down and just writing for like even an hour or more just kind of writing because I feel like that definitely helps too is when you just block out that time and just kind of focus. Yeah. So like overall though it was about a month of writing with or even just like a few weeks kind of thing. But yeah.

Laurie:                                  09:02                     Yeah. And it sounds like you sort of outlined and planned all on your phone and your notes. So then when you actually sat down and there was a lot of it already done.

Teagan:                                09:12                     Yeah.

Laurie:                                  09:12                     Nice. Okay, cool. Um, what advice would you have for people who haven’t published their books yet or maybe finished writing them?

Teagan:                                09:23                     Well, so if you, if you’re kind of maybe putting it off for you know, different things like that or you don’t know where to start then like I said earlier, the best way to start is just start. So that’s like the first thing. But then the second thing would be really just to like block out time. Like I mentioned a little bit, but I feel like sometimes you’ll say you want to do something but then you just kind of leave it to chance sort of thing. So you’re like okay I’ll get to it eventually or whatever. And then that one day becomes like you’re never going to do it, so you just have to decide to make today your day one kind of thing. And then just like, I’m really decide to start today and then just block out time. So kind of stop what you’re doing if you were gonna obviously you have to do certain things but say you’re going to watch like a TV show or something, maybe decide to not do that and you can do that another day and in that hour that you would have watched tv instead just focus on writing and then, because I mean we all have the same 24 hours in a day so it’s really just about what you do with it and there’s that quote like time does fly, but you’re the pilot so it’s all about just kind of structuring your time in the right way so that you can just leave room for that and really just kind of planning it out and actually having these time blocks of like exact times when you’re going to just focus on writing and then it, it’s really like if you do that then you’ll be able to write the book for sure.

Laurie:                                  10:36                     Cool. And share with us, you wrote to me about the actual science behind once you actually sit down, like you said, block off your time and sit down and focus, share with people the science behind why that actually helps.

Teagan:                                10:49                     Yeah. So I mean there’s lots of different kind of studies are things around this like term, like, you know, deep work or things like that where instead of just chopping up your work, you’re able to just like focus for like an hour, even a few hours at a time on one thing without any distractions kind of thing. And the analogy that I use is just like, you know, if you have to push a car from point a to point b, if you’re kind of chopping up your work overtime, so you’re like going to work for like 30 minutes and then take a break and then come back for like a little bit later and do something else maybe. And just like, you know, constantly chopping up your work. Then it’s like when you’re pushing a car and you push it a little bit and then you stop. And then you push it a little bit and it never really gets momentum, but when you’re, when you’re actually focusing on it for a long time and you’re pushing it, it gets to the point where it gets rolling and you don’t even really have to do anything. You just let momentum do it’s job kind of thing. So. But then like you were asking like the actual science behind it is like there’s this thing called Myelin and it, it’s like when you’re focused for a long period of time, it kind of develops over your neurons and actually makes your brain cells fire much faster. So it makes you much more effective and creative. And basically the way this happens is just when you’re like, it won’t happen right away, but it’s like when you’re focused on one thing for a while, it gets the point where it’s like, that’s you’re able to really get to the point where you really gain momentum and you’re really able to just focus a lot better. And eventually you get a lot more done but focusing for like a long time kind of thing. And then that’s basically how it works. And then I know there are other terms that people use, like, you know, flow states, there’s I’m the guy that coined that term kind of thing and there’s lots of different things around that of just like, you know, focusing. And then when you, when you focus, that’s when everything just kind of starts rolling and that’s when, like I said, the momentum just kind of picks up.

Laurie:                                  12:30                     And so when you talk about, after you focused, you know, for awhile, can you just share with people, are you talking about like a half an hour and then that brain stuff starts happening? Are we talking like eight hours so that people have an idea what they have to block?

Teagan:                                12:43                     Yeah. So I’m not entirely sure of the exact thing. I feel like in a way it kind of depends on the person, but I would say like as sort of a recommendation, I’d say like for starters, if you were to focus for like half an hour, then eventually you get to the point where definitely you are going to be able to really be the focus and even if you did for like an hour, if you blocked out like an hour of time just to focus then you are then that’ll definitely get that kind of working. Like you don’t necessarily need to work for eight hours or whatever. Tt doesn’t need to be super long because then it also gets the point where you know, you get kind of tired I guess. So then it’s less effective. So like the other way but, but yeah, I feel like just to the point that you can actually manage to actually stay focused and just kind of figure out you know, what works best for you, how long you can stay focused and then just kind of do that amount of time. Like as much as you can. Really.

Laurie:                                  13:33                     Yeah. I agree with you and I feel like if people started with an hour they would, you can feel it right, you on, you get frustrated and you click all around in your brain kind of and then you hit that flow state. So for some people you’re right, maybe it’s a half an hour, maybe it’s an hour, maybe it’s two hours, but as long as you block off an hour maybe to start with and then just pay attention. You learn for your own self when you hit that sweet spot.

Teagan:                                13:58                     Yeah, exactly. Well and also I feel like some people they might like, you know, they’ll only focus for half an hour or whatever and so then they think like you’re saying, they’re kind of like scatter scatterbrained or whatever. They’re just kind of not really experiencing this focus. So then they’re thinking, okay, well I’m done now I’m already getting not focused anymore and stuff. So then they get distracted and like keep on moving around. But, I feel really you just need to try it and actually be able to like kind of stretch that out and actually focus for awhile and then that’s when you’re going to get to the point where you actually see what you can actually last for kind of thing.

Laurie:                                  14:29                     Don’t give up next to the one hour. Yeah. What would you say is the best thing you’ve learned throughout this process?

Teagan:                                14:39                     I mean really like aside from just getting started, it’s really just like, I guess it is really important definitely to kind of lay things out and really organize your thoughts because on the other side of things it’s talking about, you know, like just getting started. But then on the other side of things, you don’t want to just get started without actually having sort of a plan in place for where you’re going to go. Because that’s something that I kind of did at the start is I just literally just kind of started writing and then I didn’t actually have a plan of where I was going to go with this. So it was just kind of all over the place so then I had to kind of restart and actually organize my thoughts better because you want to have it like actually be able to flow from one point to another and organize what the chapters are, what you want people to get out from it and like really making the whole book kind of be like a journey starting from where the person is to by the end of the book they’re going to know how to get from where they are to where they want to go. And then also in each chapter is kind of like a mini journey I guess where like each chapter is like an individualized, taking them from one place to another place from where they are to where they want to go. And then the book is the bigger version of that where it’s kinda like that I feel like just kind of structuring that flow so that you can actually like just structured a lot better and just really organized your thoughts that way.

Laurie:                                  15:50                     So you’re definitely a fan of plotting and outlining. There’s a whole movement of people that prefer to, they call it pantsing, fly by the seat of their pants and just let the flow take them and let it all come out. But I kind of agree with you. Some books do come out. I wrote one book, the first in a chapter book series. I think I wrote it in one evening in a couple of hours and of course I had to edit it, but then the second and the third one, it’s like pulling teeth. I can’t get it out. So finally I realized okay, I should really start outlining. And you’re right, it makes it a lot easier. And then you see the arc in each chapter you see the arc over the whole book. So you’ve learned a lot about writing obviously. Were you always into writing?

Teagan:                                16:31                     Yeah, I would say so. Like it’s never been necessarily something that I really enjoyed. But like when I was, when I was young I did read a lot of fiction books and stuff. Like ever since I was really young kid, I remember when I was like, I don’t know, probably younger than 10, I think I was super proud because I actually remember one day how I, I literally read Garfield, it was like some comic for like four hours straight or something like that. But yeah, so I’ve always, I’ve always been really into that kind of reading and then as I got older I got more into like entrepreneurship and stuff. So I’ve been reading lots of nonfiction books but. So I’ve been really into reading. But then on the actual writing side of things, I haven’t always really necessarily enjoyed writing but, but I did, once I got started with this book, it was, it was kind of a fun process for the most part.

Laurie:                                  17:18                     I think that’s so incredible that you’re 16 and you’ve written this book and you’ve learned all that stuff and apply it to yourself. And is the book selling well? Like how many dollar signs have you made and what’s the best thing that you’ve bought or that you find to buy?

Teagan:                                17:33                     Yeah. So, it’s honestly, I’m not even sure exactly how many it’s sold. I know I’ve been selling someone Amazon and online, but the main, the main way that I’m selling it right now is really just like taking it to events where I’m speaking at and then I mentioned earlier how like, you know, using it as credibility but then also once you have that speaking gig, it’s a good way to sort of make money on the back end as well selling the books there. So that’s kind of the main way that I’ve been doing it is doing a speaking gig and then people will want to buy the book, things like that. So and then as for the thing that I want to buy with like what I’m making from that. Honestly for me the main thing is just like investing in, I know it sounds kind of boring or whatever, but like honestly I don’t even at this point care that much to buy like different sorts of things. The main thing is just really reinvesting back into like learning, doing more things entrepreneurial wise or even just like doing things like traveling and networking at events and things like that I feel like is definitely a good thing to do. For sure.

Laurie:                                  18:30                     How old are you again? Yeah, you sound a lot like me. That’s exactly what I like to spend my money on too. But I’m not sure that most kids your age feel the same. It doesn’t sound boring to me because I love it too. I just, I love to learn and I’ll definitely spend my money where I think it’s going to be worth my time as far as learning and the traveling. Yes, absolutely.

Teagan:                                18:54                     Yeah. I mean if, if you enjoy it then you may as well because I mean you’re going to make more money from that, so.

Laurie:                                  18:58                     Yeah. Yeah. So can you share with people, um, do you have a website or how they can find your book or if somebody wanted to maybe book you for speaking or talked to you about that, can you share where they can find you?

Teagan:                                19:11                     Yeah, so probably the best way is if you go to bookteagan.Mykajabi.Com, so that’s like book and t e a g a n . my and then k a j a B I.com. Okay. So that’s kinda like the website that I just created fairly recently and it’s just kind of for like booking speaking gigs and then more info on I have like my speaker reel on there. It’s getting created at the time we’re recording this, but by the time this is released it’ll probably be, it should be done like in a couple of days. So, but yeah, so that’s probably the best way. Or just like on instagram @TeaganAdams1, that’s where people can reach out if they want to find out more. Whatever.

Laurie:                                  19:51                     I’m just gonna write it down because I’ll share it in the notes when this does go out to teaganadams1 on Instagram. Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing with us. I think that, so many people will find your story really inspirational just like I do because I just feel like there’s no excuses and I love how you talk about, you know, like it is a mind game and just stop overthinking it and start taking the action and just start with those baby steps and start pushing that car and then don’t stop.

Teagan:                                20:20                     Yeah. For sure yeah.

Laurie:                                  20:22                     Cool. Any last wisdom or words or…?

Teagan:                                20:26                     Not really. I think that’s kind of the main thing, but yeah, I mean just leaving off with just that one thing. Just get started. Just if you’re wanting to write a book, just like keep learning, but the main thing is really just take action and just start writing and that’s, that’s really the key thing that I want everyone to take away from this for sure.

Laurie:                                  20:41                     Cool. Thank you so much Teagan. I’ll say goodbye.

Teagan:                                20:44                     Yeah. Thank you.

Laurie:                                  20:47                     Thank you.

Outro:                                   20:47                     You’ve been listening to the Wrighter’s Way Podcast. For show notes, links to gets information, and to learn more about the Wrighter’s Way check out lauriewrighter.com. Until next week, enjoy this chapter of your life.

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